Expert Reviews

An expert review is an evaluation of your product or website by a user experience expert using widely accepted user experience heuristics, usability principles, and the deep industry experience of the individual performing the review. Expert reviews are typically a short project that clients find valuable as a complement to a lab study or as part of a larger user-centered design effort. At Blink, most expert reviews consist of two complementary parts: a heuristic evaluation and a cognitive walkthrough.

Heuristic Evaluation

A heuristic evaluation consists of an evaluation of a product or system against well-established usability guidelines, or “heuristics.” The outcome of a heuristic evaluation is the identification and prioritization of areas for improvement. A heuristic evaluation can include all of an application or site or just part of it.

Cognitive Walkthrough


A cognitive walkthrough analyzes the steps required of users to perform tasks with a product or system. The research team identifies user roles, and goal-oriented scenarios and tasks guide the analysis as reviewers role-play the part of users “walking through” the actual or prototyped product or system to complete tasks, identifying any usability obstacles they encounter. When paired with a heuristic evaluation, the cognitive walkthrough produces a powerful set of findings that allow the client to implement dramatic usability improvements in its product or site.

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