Geoff Harrison, Chief Design Officer & Partner

Geoff Harrison

Chief Design Officer

Geoff Harrison is the Chief Design Officer at Blink. He has been instrumental in building a full-service user-centered design practice at Blink, uniting the firm’s research expertise with innovative design, prototyping, and development. This work relies on evidence-driven design strategies to help Blink’s combined teams create more desirable and useful products for our clients. He created a workshop on evidence-driven design, which he delivered at UX Week and Convey UX, and has also been a guest lecturer for the University of Washington’s Human-Centered Design and Engineering program.

Prior to Blink, Geoff founded Eye Level, a design studio, and was the creative director at Modern Digital Seattle. He holds bachelor’s degrees in graphic design and mass media management from Miami University in Ohio and a graduate certificate in user-centered design from the University of Washington.

When not at work, he designs rockets, Lego forts, and scavenger hunts with his three boys and takes them skiing, hiking, or anything else that burns energy. He also enjoys cooking and finding great places to eat with his wife.

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Organizations that embrace evidence-driven design increase profits, retain customers, and align on business goals quicker than their engineering-led counterparts. This article will discuss what it means to be a design-led organization and how you can apply design in any industry.

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Here are five key UX opportunity areas healthcare systems are looking at for improving the patient/provider experience.

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Target These Three Innate Needs to Improve User Engagement

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We set design objectives for creating engaging products that will keep a user’s attention, encourage task completion, and be enjoyable to use. However, of those objectives, we find “enjoyable to use” the hardest to design for and measure. This is in large part because humans perceive experiences differently – what one person thinks is clever and clear, someone else may see as complex and opaque.

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